Brown Sugar Pecan Peach Cobbler

June 30, 2019

brown sugar pecan peach cobbler
Recipe by Local Roots recipe contributor, Emily Hanhan, @nomnivorous

Recipe based on Stella Parks' cobbler recipes found in her cookbook and on Serious Eats.

Ingredients
For the Filling:
28 ounces sliced peaches (from about 2 lbs fruit)
½ cup (3.75 ounces ounces) brown sugar
½ cup (3.5 ounces) granulated sugar
6 tablespoons (1.5 ounces) tapioca flour (also known as tapioca starch)
2 tablespoons (1 ounce) lemon juice
1 teaspoon bourbon, rum or whiskey (optional)
½ teaspoon smoked salt
2 ounces toasted, chopped pecans, divided

For the Biscuit Topping:
1 cup (4.5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon (½ ounce) granulated sugar
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
¾ teaspoon smoked salt
1 stick (4 ounces) butter, frozen
½ cup (4 ounces) buttermilk, cold

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 7” x 11” casserole dish with butter. Put the casserole dish on a foil or parchment lined larger baking sheet.
  2. In a large non-reactive bowl (not metal), combine all the filling ingredients except for the pecans. Stir together thoroughly. Set aside while making the biscuits.
  3. In a medium bowl, add the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk together.
  4. Using a large grater, grate in the butter to the flour mixture. Stir a few times as you work your way through the stick of butter so the frozen, grated butter gets coated with flour.
  5. Once all the butter has been grated, stir again to incorporate the dry ingredients. Add the buttermilk and stir together with a spatula.
  6. Add all but a handful of pecans to the fruit filling. Stir thoroughly and pour the mixture into the prepared casserole dish.
  7. Using a big spoon, dollop the biscuits on top of the fruit filling. You should be able to get about 8 spoonfuls so space them out as you go.
  8. Sprinkle the remaining pecans directly on the biscuits.
  9. Bake for 45-50 minutes, until it is bubbling and the biscuits are golden brown. Cool for at least an hour before serving (a necessary step to assist the filling to set up and thicken, as I learned from Stella Parks).