Fermented Peach Hot Sauce

July 17, 2020

Fermented Peach Hot Sauce

Like pickles, hot sauces can be made using vinegar, which speeds along the entire process, allowing for a shorter window between preparation and consumption (and there’s no arguing against that kind of convenience). But fermented hot sauces are known for being more complex, delivering notes of umami as well as a more nuanced taste, which is something to strive for too. Check out this Scoville scale to gauge and alter the recipe according to preferred spiciness. Of course, subbing Scotch bonnets for less (or more) intense peppers is an option as well. Whereas standard hot sauces use sizable measurements of sugar to balance heat as well as saltiness, this recipe leans on the sweetness of seasonal produce to provide contrast. This recipe was developed with the floral fruitiness of peaches in mind, but here again, feel free to sub for another sweet fruit like mango; it’ll get the job done just as well. So, with that being said, grab some peppers and get fermenting!


Ingredients:

3 Local Roots Local Roots peaches, sliced

2 Scotch bonnet peppers, roughly chopped and deseeded 

3 fresno chiles, roughly chopped and deseeded

6 black peppercorns

4 tsp. salt

4 tsp. sugar

2 cups water

1 sprig tarragon

1 inch knob of ginger, peeled and cut into pieces


Tools:

Glass jar 

Blender

Strainer


Directions:

  1. Pour salt and sugar into water into jar and shake.
  2. Add spices, peach slices, and deseeded peppers.
  3. Using a gloved hand, massage the contents of the jar until it appears well-combined.
  4. Let ferment for about a week, taking care to open the lid daily to release pressure. This is called “burping.”
  5. After about a week, strain the brine from solids with a sieve. 
  6. Blend solids with a small amount of brine (if the blender begins to heat up, pulse on a lower setting or take a break to avoid overheating which can kill useful bacteria).
  7. Pour into mason jars or any other glass container and store in the refrigerator for up to six months.

No-Waste Tip: 

Save the brine in a separate container for dowsing over food where a thinner hot sauce is desired.


Recipe by Local Roots Volunteer Jess Santoro (@jess_santoro)





Rather have a taste first?

Local Roots Experiences are fun, pop-up events where we bring the farm to you!

Ready?

Delicious, farm-fresh harvests are closer than you think.


Top