Mushroom quinoa with watercress, scallions, and peas

March 08, 2019

Adapted from Sun Basket

Serves 2

Ingredients
1 or 2 cloves organic peeled fresh garlic
3 organic scallions
5 ounces organic cremini or other button mushrooms
½ cup rainbow quinoa
½ teaspoon porcini powder
¾ ounce dried shiitake mushrooms
1 bunch organic watercress
1 organic lemon
1 cup peas
2 tablespoons gluten-free tamari

 

Procedure

  1. Wash and prep your ingredients by finely chopping, pressing, or grating the garlic. Trim the root ends from the scallions; cut the scallions into ¼-inch-thick slices, keeping the white and green parts separate. Set aside the green parts for finishing the risotto. Thinly slice the cremini mushrooms. Rinse the quinoa.
  2. In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, warm 2 to 3 teaspoons oil until hot but not smoking. Stir in the garlic and white parts of the scallions and cook until starting to soften, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the cremini mushrooms and quinoa and toast until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the porcini powder and 1½ cups (3 cups) water, season lightly with salt, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the quinoa is tender and the water is absorbed, 20 to 22 minutes. Fluff with a fork, cover, and keep warm.
  3. While the quinoa simmers, combine the shiitake mushrooms and 2½ cups (5 cups) water in a medium sauce pot. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are softened and the liquid is reduced by half, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain the mushrooms; discard the stems and thinly slice the caps.
  4. Trim the root ends and any coarse stems from the watercress. Cut the lemon into wedges for garnish. To the pan with the quinoa, stir in the shiitake mushrooms, watercress, peas, green parts of the scallions, and as much tamari as you like.
  5. Transfer the quinoa to individual bowls, garnish with the lemon wedges, and serve.




Rather have a taste first?

Local Roots Experiences are fun, pop-up events where we bring the farm to you!

Ready?

Delicious, farm-fresh harvests are closer than you think.


Top