Mustardy Bok Choy Mashed Potatoes

May 28, 2019

Recipe by Local Roots recipe contributor, Chef Casey Corn @casey_corn

Any sort of cabbage goes over great in my household, but bok choy is very possibly one of my favorite greens ever. Its peppery flavor combined with the freshness of its crunch create an amazing flavor experience regardless of whether you eat it raw or cook it. This recipe tempers the bite of raw bok choy, while rounding out the dish with tangy mustard and fragrant garlic. 

Ingredients:

2 ea large baking potatoes

1 ½ c thinly sliced bok choy (from 2 medium sized bunches)

2 tsp extra virgin olive oil

½ c heavy cream

3 ea garlic cloves, smashed

2 Tbs unsalted butter

1 - 2 Tbs dijon mustard (to taste)

3 Tbs kosher salt

½ tsp ground white pepper

 

Directions:

1. Place two tablespoons of salt in a medium pot. Peel potatoes, and cut into pieces about an inch big, and place in the pot. Cover potatoes with cold water, give a stir to dissolve salt, and place pot over medium heat. Bring slowly to a simmer, then lower temperature slightly and cook, until a fork goes cleanly through, about 25-30 min.

2. Discarding the root and any shriveled or discolored leaves of the bok choy, slice thinly, and set aside in a bowl. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Saute the bok choy until stems are starting to turn transparent, then season with a teaspoon of salt, and transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to remove any excess liquid.

3. In a small pot, combine heavy cream, butter, garlic, pepper, and mustard, and whisk to combine. Infuse over the lowest heat possible, being careful not to bring to a simmer.

4. When potatoes are done, drain, then add potatoes back to the pot and mash. For creamier potatoes, use a potato ricer first. Strain cream mixture into the potatoes, and whisk until smooth and incorporated. Fold in bok choy, and season to taste.





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