Pancit Molo

April 10, 2018

Recipe by Jenn de la Vega
@randwiches

The only person I know that makes pancit molo is my auntie Belinda. Whether I was 7 years old and finished playing the backyard or visiting her vacation house in the Philippines, she always had a pot of this soup ready for us kids. Pancit is one of the national dishes of the Philippines but it doesn’t have a consistent identity. Most people think of bihon glass noodles with shredded vegetables in a big foil pan. Others may have grown up with shrimp infused palabok with hard boiled eggs and crushed chicharron.

Panic molo is Filipino dumpling soup. The dumplings are filled with very little meat or vegetable so that the dumpling wrapper wings flap gloriously in the soup. Replace the filling with any dumpling mix or super finely shredded stir fry.

1 quart of chicken broth
20 dumpling wrappers
4 sausages
1 egg
1/4 head of green cabbage, shredded
4 cloves of garlic
Sesame seeds
Black pepper
Optional: soy sauce

Remove the skin from the sausage and form into 20 small balls.
Place a ball in the center of each dumpling wrapper, wipe the edges with the beaten egg and seal closed.
Keep the finished dumplings in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze for 20 minutes.
If you’re not making the soup right away, divide the dumplings into individual serving sizes of 5 in plastic zip bags.

Slice the garlic as thin as you can into chips. Fry them in the oil on high for 2-3 minutes until the edges start to turn golden brown. Turn off the heat and move the pan away to another burner. Let it steep and continue cooking for 15 to 20 minutes until the garlic is golden brown. Drain from the oil and place on paper towels. The oil is now garlicky! You can use it to fry eggs or whatever you want.


To serve the soup, bring the broth to a boil and cook the dumplings for 3 minutes. Bring the heat down to low and continue to cook until the dumplings are wrinkled in the center. Ladle dumplings and soup into four bowls. Top with shredded cabbage, sesame seed and a little pepper. If you’d like more salt, add a dash of soy sauce.